Monday, March 29, 2010

TK in the Round

If you have ever visited Salt Lake City, Utah, you probably noticed how no matter what direction you looked, there were mountains on the horizon. It is like SLC is in the middle of a crown of mountains; some, being larger jewels than others, but all forming an encompassing ridge line. Many people, such as myself, who were born and lived there, can tell where we are in the SLC valley by which mountain we are facing. For many natives, the constant sight of the mountains in the near distance also brings a certain sense of comfort and feeling of home.

I don't know about comfort, but I certainly was struck with a small sense of deja vu' when arriving in TK and found myself ringed by mountains. Although it is a bit more like being in the center of a flipped-over bottle cap versus the royalty of SLC since the heights are not so majestic as those of the Wasatch, the view is still quite impressive. If I squint some, okay, a lot, I can almost fool myself into thinking I am in Tooele or perhaps a bit further west in the Bonneville area. Although the TK mountains are definitely more craggy and weather scarred - it easy to see how the wind is actively carving and sandblasting the topography.

The beast to the beauty of SLC's mountains is the frequent temperature inversions, which will cause the smog formed from automobile exhaust and other pollutants to be trapped in the valley like a bowl of carcinogenic soup.

Here in TK, inversions will hopefully not be such an issue as there is comparatively little air pollution as there is zero industry and a very limited vehicular usage. So, ideally, I will get all the comforts of home without being exhausted.

Responses to Comments from Previous Post:

Len: Thank you, as always, for your kind words and support - glad to be able to keep you occupied while you were manning the bench.

Steve/Mary: I am not sure why the font color changed, but I believe it is fixed on this post - thank you for reading.

Mary: There are liter bottles available as well, but as you said, there is little alternative so I will need to figure out some way to recover my eco-kharma. Thank you for reading.

Maggie: Nice to meet you. As you will see from this post, I am a Utah Corbin, but am sure we must have common linage. I will reach out to you via email. Meanwhile, thank you for reading.

1 comment:

  1. Good luck with your assignment "in the rough."

    As the parent of a Navy Lt. who has been "Loaned" to the army for most of the year, I wish to express my appreciation for all you folks do under less than ideal circumstances.

    As for Kindle's, I did send one with my son, who is supposed to deploy to somewhere, he didn't know where last time we talked, sometime in April. You know how fixed deployment dates can be.

    Good luck with your Kindles for Kandahar project. (I think it has since been renamed, but can't remember the new one."

    Dave Deitrick
    Muskegon, Michigan

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